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Child Vaccine Programme Print E-mail

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Get your child vaccinated

PROTECTING YOUR CHILD AGAINST INFECTIOUS DISEASES

To protect your child against life threatening childhood diseases, the Zuzimpilo clinic medical team strongly recommends vaccination or immunisation.

What is immunisation?

Immunisation is a method of artificially stimulating the immune system to provide protection against specific serious infections. This is done by giving a vaccine.

Vaccines “teach” the immune system how to recognize and fight certain germs, bacteria and viruses before a particular disease can gain a foothold. By giving the body a small “sample” or harmless example of the germ, it can develop resistance, without actually contracting the disease.

Importance of child immunisation

Certain vaccine-preventable diseases can affect babies and children.  Vaccinating or immunising younger children helps provide them with protection when it is needed. It is far better to prevent an infectious illness than to treat the illness and its complications. Immunisation is therefore very cost effective. Immunisation has been an enormous help to prevent children from dying in many countries and is recognised as a safe and effective way of preventing death and disease.

Some of these immunisations have to be repeated to make sure the baby/child remains protected.

Recommended vaccines

South Africa’s recommended Childhood Vaccination Schedule is adopted from the World Health Organisation. These vaccines are available free of charge at local clinics and community health centres.

Private clinics (such as Zuzimpilo Clinic) also provide these vaccines for free, but may require a consultation fee, this usually includes a counselling session that monitors, among other things, the growth and development of the baby.

Vaccinations

  • Birth: OPV 0 and BCG
  • 6 weeks: OPV 1 and DPT 1 and HepB 1 and Hib 1
  • 10 weeks: OPV 2 and DPT 2 and HepB 2 and Hib 2
  • 14 weeks: OPV 3 and DPT 3 and HepB 3 and Hib 3
  • 9 months: Measles 1
  • 18 months: OPV 4 and DPT 4 and Measles 2
  • 5 years: OPV 5 and DT

Abbreviations

  • BCG: Bacillus Calmette Guerin vaccine (prevents TB)
  • OPV: Oral polio vaccine
  • DPT: Diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus vaccine
  • HepB: Hepatitis B vaccine
  • Hib: haemophilus influenzae B vaccine

Child immunisations records

It is very important that all immunisations are carefully recorded on the infant’s Road-to-Health Card. Both the type and the date of the immunisation must be recorded.

It is an essential and important part of primary health care to record all immunisations carefully. Even though DPT and Hib are given as a single injection, they must be recorded separately on the card.

The Road-to-Health Card is the official immunisation record needed for clinic visits, hospital admission and attendance at crèche and school.

Importance of immunisations dates

It is important to give immunisations at the recommended time according to the immunisation schedule above.

  • If an immunisation is given too early (e.g. if measles immunisation is given at 3 months), the infant may not develop the expected resistance to the illness due to the immune system still being too immature to respond fully.
  • If an immunisation is given too late (e.g. not giving measles immunisation at 9 months), the infant may develop that illness before the immunisation can be given.
  • If immunisations are given too soon after the previous immunisation (e.g. if DPT immunisations are given a week apart), the infant may not develop the expected resistance to the illness.

All the most important immunisations should be given by the time the child reaches 9 months of age.

Sources:  Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Health Society South Africa, Health-24, Your-parenting Magazine, Child Healthcare, Kids Health


Annual Health Checks | High Blood Pressure Management | Diabetes Management | Cholesterol Screening | Adult Immunisation | Family Planning | Pap SmearsVoluntary HIV Testing | CD4 TestingWellness ProgrammeARV ProgrammePrevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission | Post-exposure Prophylaxis | TB Screening | Pharmacy

 

One man’s reaction to his diagnosis.

 

How this lady’s life has improved

10 ways to be successful on ARVs

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Antiretroviral therapy typically combines three or more antiretroviral drugs that work together to keep the HI Virus from multiplying. Although antiretroviral drugs improve health and delay death, they do not cure HIV/AIDS.

 

  1. Commit to drug taking: ART is lifelong treatment which needs to be taken correctly for it to be effective.
  2. Get to know your treatment: Ensure that you know and understand what medication you are on and how to take it.
  3. Choose a pill time: Get help from your healthcare provider to work out a medication schedule that will fit into your daily activities.
  4. Remember your medication: Make use of an alarm clock or cellphone to remind you when to take your medication.
  5. Get a pillbox: Keep a supply of your drugs with you wherever you go, so that you do not miss your pill time (it also helps to have a bottle of water with you).
  6. Get a treatment buddy: It helps to disclose to someone close to you, preferably someone who lives with you, who will be able to offer you support and to remind you to take your treatment.
  7. Missed doses: If you miss a dose take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose then you should wait and take the next dose. Do not take double doses.
  8. Stopping treatment: Do not stop treatment on your own, unless instructed to do so by your doctor.
  9. Be aware of side effects: Ensure that your health care provider has explained to you any possible side effects that you may experience. If you do experience any report them to your Health care provider as soon as possible.
  10. Monitoring and evaluation: Be sure to keep all scheduled appointments with your healthcare provider, especially in the first few months of taking treatment, so that the effect of the treatment can be monitored.

 

 

Name: Sarah
Female
Age: 34 years

This patient found out that she was HIV positive when she was 4 months pregnant. She struggled to tell her mom and her partner who also found out he was HIV positive. She gave birth to an HIV negative son. Her family supports her to take her ARVS every evening when Generations begin and she hasn’t looked back. In fact she often forgets she is HIV positive!

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Name: Disebo

Female
Age: 39 years

This ZuziMpilo Medical Centre patient thought she would die within three days of her AIDS diagnosis which she discovered after the birth of her son. Rather than tell her family the truth, she told her mom she had Cancer, but when she finally admitted to having AIDS, she was almost forced to leave home. Thankfully she began on ARVs. She says: “Seven year later I am still doing well on treatment and living a healthy life thanks to the drugs. Antiretroviral medication really works!”

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